About Luxury Care

Welcome Home

Luxurycare offers nursing and residential care for elderly residents, some of whom may also have additional support needs as a result of the problems associated with old age such as dementia. The care and support is provided for as long as the Care Homes can meet the needs of the individual, respecting their nights to informed choice, privacy and to always be treated with dignity. Aranlaw House (Branksome Park, Poole), Birds Hill Nursing Home (Poole), Regency Manor Care Home (Lower Parkstone, Poole) and Seabourne House (Southbourne, Bournemouth) provide Bournemouth and Poole’s premier Care Homes.

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Our Ethos

Welcome Home

Luxurycare offers nursing and residential care for elderly residents, some of whom may also have additional support needs as a result of the problems associated with old age such as dementia. The care and support is provided for as long as the Care Homes can meet the needs of the individual, respecting their nights to informed choice, privacy and to always be treated with dignity. Aranlaw House (Branksome Park, Poole), Birds Hill Nursing Home (Poole), Regency Manor Care Home (Lower Parkstone, Poole) and Seabourne House (Southbourne, Bournemouth) provide Bournemouth and Poole’s premier Care Homes.

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About Luxury Care

Our Ethos

Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) made perhaps the most succinct statement about care:

If you really want to help somebody, first of all you must find him where he is and start there. This is the secret of caring. If you cannot do that, it is only an illusion if you think you can help another human being. Helping somebody implies your understanding more than he does, but first of all you must understand what he understands. If you cannot do that, your understanding will be of no avail……… the helper must be humble in his attitude towards the people he wants to help. He must understand that helping is not dominating, but serving. Caring implies patience as well as acceptance of not being right and of not understanding what the other person understands.

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All behaviour has meaning …

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In dementia, a person’s behaviour or behaviour changes are never seen as senseless, crazy or stupid.

Our skilled staff can often pieced together the meaning of a given behaviour in the person with dementia, taking into account previous events, triggers, family information or observation about what the person is trying to do.

Reduced logical thinking ability and memory abilities may prevent a person from being able to have insight into their behaviour. Reduced verbal ability can make even attempts to explain it impossible.

Regency Manor

Aranlaw House

Birds Hill

Seabourne House

Testimonials

What Is Dementia? – Alzheimer’s Society

Dancing with dementia

We would like to bring your attention to the following extract from ‘Dancing with Dementia’ written by Christine Bryden, who was first diagnosed with dementia in 1995:

“Try to enter our distorted reality, because if you make us fit into your reality, it will cause us extra stress. You need to enter into our reality, connect with us by touch, or by look. You need to be authentically present, not far away. You need to realise that we are not far away or lost, but trapped by an inability to communicate and to think clearly, to express this strange mixed-up world being created by our brain damage. Think about this inner reality that we are experiencing, and try to connect with it. Be imaginative, be creative, try to step across the divide between our worlds.”